Friday Fictioneers – Love Used To Be A Friend Of Mine

(No Author’s Note today: Just keep doing what you’re doing.)

janet-webb-french-still-life

© Janet Webb

Love Used To Be A Friend Of Mine

by Miles H. Rost

Paul Whitaker looked at the glass candy bowl, and sighed.

A gift given to him by a wonderful woman, the candy bowl was used quite a bit when he would host family gatherings. It was his estate that the Whitaker family reunion was held every 5 years. The kids always loved the candy bowl.

Then they stopped coming around. Things got busy. Soon enough, it was just him and his wife, Helen.

That memory, the last time he saw Helen alive, etched into his mind.

The candy bowl, the reminder of love, lay shattered on the floor.

His love was gone.

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Friday Fictioneers – Fellowship Hall

(Author’s note: I am currently in the beginning stages of transition from Australia to my next assignment, which will be in…I actually do not know where. We’ll see what happens. Here’s today’s Fictioneers offering, again not based on a true story.)

 

©Roger Bultot

Fellowship Hall

by Miles H. Rost

20 years.

Everyone was finally together. All 85 of Mitchell High School’s class of 1995. And the stories were flying.

“Do you remember Joan Snart? Apparently, she’s directing adult films in Hollywood.”
“Can’t be anything like my ex-boyfriend, Russell Graves. He’s the undercarriage cleaner for Greyhound in Seattle.”

The laughter was palpable, and the stories continued. That was, until the name was brought up.

“Anyone heard from Brian McLaurence?”

The entire place had become silent at that instant. The class looked at each other, and bowed their heads.

“Robbery,” someone said, “I was on duty. I found him. Died on scene.”

A sniffle started the flow of tears in the room.

Friday Fictioneers – Smoky Mountain Rain

Make sure to read Fool’s Gold, if at all possible. It’s a good story! Anyhow, on with the show!

 

copyright Erin Leary

Smoky Mountain Rain

“Chelsea, I don’t think I’m coming back.”

Chelsea Jacobs looked out over the gully in the early morning, as she talked to her brother in Taiwan

“But, what about Dad? He’s dying!”

“I return to the states, I lose what I’ve gained over here. I know Dad would say that I should continue to live my life, even after he’s gone.”

I can’t live without you here.”

“Then come with me, we can do great things together.”

“I don’t have the money!”

“Leave that rain behind, I’ll take care of it.”